Jupiter Research Paper

Jupiter Research Paper-62
Thank you for your interest in spreading the word on PNAS.NOTE: We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it, and that it is not junk mail. The Solar System is an unusual member of the galactic planetary census in that it lacks planets that reside in close proximity to the Sun.

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As storms go, Jupiter’s colossal Great Red Spot, 16,000 kilometers wide and raging for 350 years, is the solar system’s heavyweight.

According to NASA, it could swallow the Earth whole and still have room for Mars.

By looking from ground-based telescopes at wavelengths sensitive to thermal radiation leaking from the depths of Jupiter’s persistent storm, the Great Red Spot, they detected the chemical signatures of water above the planet’s deepest clouds.

This finding supports theoretical computer-simulation models that have predicted abundant water (H2O) on Jupiter made of oxygen (O) tied up with molecular hydrogen (H2).

New spectroscopic technology and sheer curiosity gave the team a boost in peering deep inside Jupiter, which has an atmosphere thousands of miles deep, Bjoraker said: “We thought, well, let’s just see what’s out there.” The data Bjoraker and his team collected will supplement the information NASA’s Juno spacecraft is gathering as it circles the planet from north to south once every 53 days.

Among other things, Juno is looking for water with its own infrared spectrometer and with a microwave radiometer that can probe deeper than anyone has seen — to 100 bars, or 100 times the atmospheric pressure at Earth’s surface.“Why wouldn’t the planet — which is this huge gravity well, where everything falls into it — be water rich, too?” “Jupiter’s water abundance will tell us a lot about how the giant planet formed, but only if we can figure out how much water there is in the entire planet,” said Steven M.Cumulatively, our results place the Solar System and the mechanisms that shaped its unique orbital architecture into a broader, extrasolar context.The statistics of extrasolar planetary systems indicate that the default mode of planet formation generates planets with orbital periods shorter than 100 days and masses substantially exceeding that of the Earth.The pressure of the water, the researchers concluded, combined with their measurements of another oxygen-bearing gas, carbon monoxide, imply that Jupiter has 2 to 9 times more oxygen than the sun.This finding supports theoretical and computer-simulation models that have predicted abundant water (H2O) on Jupiter made of oxygen (O) tied up with molecular hydrogen (H2).One critical question has bedeviled astronomers for generations that may have been answered by the swirling mystery of this iconic storm: Is there water deep in Jupiter’s atmosphere, and if so, how much? EST), as the spacecraft performed its 17th science pass of Jupiter.“Giant planets are not simple balls of hydrogen and helium,” said Ravit Helled, a planetary scientist at the University of Zurich in Switzerland. At the time the images were taken, the spacecraft was between 16,700 miles (26,900 kilometers) and 59,300 miles (95,400 kilometers) above Jupiter’s cloud tops, above a southern latitude spanning from about 40 to 74 degrees.A striking view of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot and turbulent southern hemisphere shown above was captured by NASA’s Juno spacecraft as it performed a close pass of the gas giant. https://dailygalaxy.com/2019/03/jupiter-like-exoplanets-may-foster-the-existence-of-advanced-life/net Astrophysicist Gordon L. Bjoraker’s reported in a recent paper in the Astronomical Journal that he and his team have brought the Jovian research community closer to the answer of Jupiter’s water.Juno took the three images used to produce this color-enhanced view on Feb. By looking from ground-based telescopes at wavelengths sensitive to thermal radiation leaking from the depths of the Great Red Spot (Juno cam image above) they detected the chemical signatures of water above the planet’s deepest clouds.

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